Cubs 100 celebrations

During 2016, 100 years of the cub scouts section has been commemorated in many ways. We finished off our own celebrations with two exciting events – the regional Cubs 100 flag parade at Flamingoland and the district Promise Party held at York University.

Flamingoland

We were watching the forecast all through the week and whilst it was a cold day it didn’t rain. That’s not to say we didn’t get wet though!

We started the day by parading the 1st Clifton, Atlantic and Pacific pack flags around the park with groups from all over the North East region, much to the excitement of a rhinoceros that was charging around its paddock.

We met back at the start point where the giant necker was suspended from the masts of the pirate ship. This necker is made up of signed individual neckers from groups throughout the Region.

We spent the rest of the day following the zoo trail. After being nominated for his commitment to Cubs activities James Byatt from our Atlantic pack was lucky enough to be chosen to represent North Yorkshire feeding the Meerkats. Being in the enclosure having meerkats walk all over him was an experience I suspect he will remember for a long time.

To finish the day we went to the Sea Lion show, where we renewed our Cubs promise, and were thrilled by the skills of the sea lions. Lots us were on the front row and several Cubs were part of the show when they got soaked by Clive the sea lion. After the show we went to see the sea lions in the back pool. Not wanting us to feel left out the other sea lions seemed to take joy in soaking the rest of us stood watching!

A thoroughly enjoyable day. Special thanks to Kathryn Surtees for helping out with driving the minibus.

Promise Party

The Promise Party was a national celebration that included a Promise renewal and was held on 16 December 2016 at 7.16pm (19:16) to commemorate the official registration date of the Cub Scout section.

We all had a fantastic time at the University, what a great way to end the year and celebrate all the activities we’ve enjoyed in this centenary year and everything we enjoy about being cub scouts.

 

It’s a bug’s life!

1stcliftonsteveibtansySteve Backshall, presenter of wildlife programmes such as Deadly 60 and Fierce, brought his Wild World tour to York this week and several very excited 1st Clifton Cubs and Beavers had the amazing experience of meeting Steve backstage during the show interval.

As Steve is a Cubs 100 Ambassador and Buglife’s Vice President, Barry had arranged for the children going to the show to meet with Steve backstage to talk to him about their conservation work with the Jewel of York, the Tansy beetle. Unfortunately Steve’s packed schedule meant there wasn’t enough time to chat but they did get their photo taken with Steve and a giant Tansy beetle (not a real one!).

We’re proud to be Buglife’s Tansy champions! Tansy champions meet wildlife hero

img_4598-2-1280x918Special thanks to Barry for organising the backstage meeting and all his hard work getting the children involved with the Tansy project.

Buglife Tansy project

tansy-beetleAs part of their learning about wildlife and conservation, our Beavers and Atlantic Cubs have been involved with the Tansy project throughout this year. The project aims to protect the rare and endangered Tansy beetle, the ‘Jewel of York’ – these beautiful beetles can only now be found along the banks of a short stretch of the river Ouse and in one other part of the country so we are very lucky that they live right alongside us here on Rawcliffe Meadow.

The children have learnt that endangered animals are not all big and their threatened habitats are not all a long way away. With the help of Julia, Buglife’s Tansy project officer, the project has taught them about this first hand and in their own local environment, opening up an exciting new area of exploration and discovery.

tansy-plantJulia brought some Tansy beetles along to our scout hut for us to see up close. She also had some Tansy plant seeds that we were able to sow and watch the plants grow. When they were ready, our Dolphin Beavers helped Julia to plant out their plants on the meadow along with some more from Julia’s greenhouse.  It has been fantastic to see how enthusiastic the children have been about being outside, learning about animals and about how plants grow.

On a lovely summer’s evening, our Cubs went on an exciting adventure hiking around Rawcliffe Meadow in search of Tansy plants and beetles in the wild and were thrilled to spot them several times.  We’ve been pleased to hear that some of them have even made trips back to the meadow since the group trip to share their knowledge and experience with their families.

Having fun, enjoying being outside, learning new things and having adventures with friends are what the Cub and Beaver programmes are all about and the Tansy project has been a great opportunity for us to do all these things as well as getting involved in a project within our community.

 

Sherburn Aero Club Visit

On our last night, Monday 13th July, we went on a visit to Sherburn Aero Club at Sherburn in Elmet.When we arrived, we met Richard, and we went inside and sat down. Richard then told us the rules; No Running, No touching anything, and there would be no flying tonight.

We then went outside and he told us about the 2 different areas of the public side where we were, and the live side beyond the gate.

Then we went through the gate and over to the plane parked outside the hanger. He told us how all the flaps work and how a plane stays in the air.

Then we went in the hanger and looked at the tiny engine and how the propeller works, and if the engine fails, it would glide falling at 600ft a minute.

He then explained how an airport works with some of the Cubs taking part as planes trying to land and trying to take off, and how the air traffic controllers make it all work.

Then we went to the back of the hanger to look at the 2 biplanes one from 1937 and the other from 1938. We learnt they were very light as they are made of canvas, and that the engines are so poor that they can barely take off, so they need more wing, but it doesn’t matter that it’s on top.

We then got the chance to sit 2 at a time, in the plane outside, playing with the joystick watching the flaps going up and down, and what all the switches and knobs do.
We then sat down outside the hanger and looked at the weather, and learnt how clouds form, and how they get full of ice, the darker they are, the more ice they have in them, and if they fly in to these, the wings would get ripped off.
Then it was time for the toilet before saying thank you to Richard for showing us around.
and also thanks to Barry for organising it, and driving us there.